Dvořák’s Cello Concerto: UMD Symphony Orchestra • LIVESTREAM

Dvořák’s Cello Concerto • LIVESTREAM

UMD Symphony Orchestra
Saturday, December 10 , 2022 . 8PM
Principal People: 

David Neely, music director
Eric Kutz, cello

Special Announcement: 

The livestream of this event will only be available to view during the performance. The video will not be available for viewing after the concert.

Event Attributes

Presented By

Presented By: 
Accessibility: 

For more information regarding accessible accommodations, please click here.

Venue: 
Seating: 
Estimated Length: 
2 hours
Intermission: 
One

Majestic and lyrical while also contemplative and somber, Antonín Dvořák’s Cello Concerto in B minor was written as a tribute to Dvořák’s first love, who was gravely ill and passed away while Dvořák was still composing. In her memory, he included the melody of his song Leave Me Alone in My Fond Dream, a particular favorite of hers. This masterwork will feature UMD Associate Professor Eric Kutz on cello.

Prayer, by Canadian composer Vivian Fung, was first recorded as a video by the CBC Virtual Orchestra, comprising members of 28 Canadian orchestras and led by Yannick Nezet-Seguin during the COVID-19 lockdown in 2020. Fung wrote: “Prayer is, in essence, an aberration, for under no other circumstance in the past (or probably in the future) have I worn my heart on my sleeve as transparently as I have with this piece.”

The program will also include Richard Strauss’ Don Juan, a tone poem based on the Byron poem. As in Mozart's opera, things end badly for the thoughtless Don.

About the UMD Symphony Orchestra (UMSO)
Through its committed and polished performances under the baton of David Neely, UMSO is dedicated to the power of musical communication. In its repertoire, the orchestra explores the intersection between traditional symphonic masterworks and marginalized works from various eras, with many programs featuring composers of diverse backgrounds.

Program:
Vivian Fung: Prayer 
Antonín Dvořák: Cello Concerto in B minor, Op. 104
Richard Strauss: Don Juan